| Book Review |
Kingmaker – Adrian Hyde

 

Harry King is in Norway with the British Army during WWII. A secret mission brings murders, devious plans, a touch of romance and a traitor in their midst.

— Introduction —

A Harry King Thriller

Kingmaker is an exciting read and captivating thriller that you just cannot put down. What secret plot is being planned in Norway during WWII? Norwegian King Haakon refuses to comply with the Nazi Regime, but the politician Quisling is only too willing to work under the occupation and command of Nazi Germany. Harry King, Lieutenant in the British Army, seeks revenge on the killer of his father. There is a traitor in their midst and only one man to stop the traitor, even if it costs him his life: Harry King.

— Storyline —

The book opens with a coldblooded murder. And another one. The first victim is a banker and the second his companion, but why they needed to be killed is not clear. We first set eyes on British Lieutenant Harry King shortly before his appearance at a Summary Hearing due to his drunk and disorderly behaviour, in short “disgraceful conduct unbecoming the character of an officer.” Harry knows he is in trouble and fears his luck has finally run out when of the three men deciding his fate he recognizes the one that hates him most: Major Hardwicke. Little does it matter that the old family friend of Harry’s father, Captain Collins is also present, Harry has to face the consequences of his alcohol induced conduct. That Harry has recurring nightmares in which he relives his father’s death in their burning house, when he was unable to save him, is a circumstance that will do little if anything to save him.

However, the third man present is Colonel Munro who whisks Harry away for a secret Intelligence job. King’s skills as a mechanic are needed for a special transport of vehicles in cooperation with the Norwegian Dragoons, the Norwegian Army loyal to King Haakon. As Norway is on the verge of falling under Nazi Germany’s occupation, King Haakon has no other choice but to flee the country and fight the enemy from abroad. On his mission Harry King takes with him his friend, Sergeant Hall. As they prepare to meet one Pederson of the Norwegian Dragoons, Colonel Munro warns Harry to not trust the man. We, the readers, suspect the feeling might be correct, as we have witnessed Pedersen kill the banker at the start of the book. Norwegian interpreter Lieutenant Anja Christensen is to accompany Hall and King, much against King’s wishes, and he has difficulty hiding his resentment to her presence.

Meanwhile the Nazis are scheming with Quisling but there are also Nazis following plans of their own. Among them the exceptionally cruel SS officer Wolff with his “infamous temper” who enjoys torturing people. There are two German Nazi Officers, Captain Fuchs and Captain Becker, each with his own agenda but both fearing Wolff and his excessive behaviour. Fuchs hates Wolff and he shivers to think what Wolff would do to him the moment he no longer needs him. What is it the Nazis are after apart from capturing King Haakon to prevent him from fleeing Norway? Quisling is ready to take over as Head of State, but even he has to endure Wolff’s anger when he tries to gain control over the country too soon. Then there is the Norwegian Pederson who has killed before. Pederson is hiding a dark secret whilst scheming with both the Nazis and the British: this is the man Harry is ordered to work for and he is not too happy about it.

Harry, Hall and Anja walk right into a trap, enabling Pedersen to escape with a cargo he is desperate to keep secret. Harry is furious because he holds Pedersen responsible for the slaughter of his team, the men he is responsible for. What is going on? Were Harry and his team being used, sacrificed for some devious scheme of Pedersen’s? What did the cargo contain and why is it worth killing for, is it a secret “worth dying for” ? Follow Harry King on his dangerous path to discover the truth, to find the one responsible for his father’s death and to seek out the traitor called Taranis whose identity is yet unknown. According to Wolff, Taranis has arrived in Norway under perfect cover as “the Norwegians remained oblivious to the traitors in their midst.” Will Harry King get his revenge, will he come to know who is responsible for his father’s death and have a chance at capturing Taranis or will he die trying?

— My Thoughts —

Kingmaker is an intriguing, fascinating and captivating read. There are gruesome details and a few instances of torture, which I hate to imagine and read about, but just when you think ‘No more!’, it stops. Most of all it is an adventurous novel, set against beautiful but occupied Norway in WWII. The historical events are accurately described and form the background for Harry King’s search for his father’s killer, for the traitor in their midst. The story is well written and the protagonists are easy to connect with – or to hate. Although I also hate to think about the horrors of WWII and the poor people who died under torture. I enjoyed reading this novel as it is an exciting thriller.

— About the Author —

Adrian Hyde Author Image

British thriller writer Adrian Hyde is a historian and son of an ex-soldier. He has studied Politics, had a career in sales, marketing and product management but had to leave his work due to personal circumstances. That is when he started picking up his writing career: his books combine a love for history with adventurous and exciting tales, plotlines set against historical facts.

— Book Info —

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 Paperback   434 pages
 Publisher   Three Assassins Press (27 Sept. 2016)
 Language   English
 ISBN-10  0995621616
 ISBN-13 978-0995621619

 

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Kingmaker – Adrian Hyde”

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